http://youtu.be/3hu6C8Bf7yI Please click the link and view our video response on youtube.

A White Paper published on Tuesday 8 November 2011 outlined the legislation due to be enacted in Wales which would see the country become the first part of the United Kingdom to have an ‘Opt Out’ organ donation system.

Despite advances in transplantation medicine organ shortage is the single most limiting factor preventing potential recipients from receiving the benefits of transplantation. One person dies a week in Wales waiting for an organ transplant.

A number of countries ‘notably Belgium in 1986’ has been cited as dramatically increasing their donation rates following the introduction of presumed consent. Belgium went from 18.9pmp to 41.3pmp three years after the introduction of presumed consent

Roy J Thomas Chairman of Kidney Wales Foundation “This is progressive move by Wales and our partners Diabetes Cymru, British Heart Foundation, The British Lung Foundation, The British Medical Association are organisations that bear witness to the need for more transplants. The UK has one of the lowest donor rates in Europe. Wales will take the lead and show that we must presume to have conversations on this important issue.”

There is concern that Wales might not have the service capacity, ITU beds, theatres, hospital staff, transplant co-ordinators and trained staff to cope with the increased number of donors resulting from presumed consent.

Roy J Thomas added “Presumed consent in itself is not the solution but rather a key facilitator which must be enacted in conjunction with a well developed system and infrastructure for organ donation and transplantation. This two pronged approach has been shown to deliver ongoing positive results for those whose lives are blighted and shortened by being on a waiting list for a transplant.”

Mr Thomas said “There has already been a significant increase in the number of donors in Wales to 66 in 2010/11 and the people of Wales understand this debate. Wales already has the highest rate of donors in the UK at 27.7pmp. There are a number of projections as to the extent to which this is likely to increase following the introduction of presumed consent. One key research is that of Abadie and Gay where figure of 25-30% increase is predicated that would mean there would be an increase to about 83 donors or 35pmp.”

Transplantation has generally been shown to be a cost effective solution particularly when examined from a societal perspective. The annual average cost for example of dialysis is £23,177 compared with an initial cost of £42,025 for a transplant followed by £6,500 annual maintenance costs (ODTF). The UKBT has shown that the existing transplantation programme realised gross annual savings in excess of £300m for the UK against alternative medical treatments. The impact of increasing organs available by 50% by 2013 (their target) would increase savings to the NHS by an additional £200m per annum.

Transplant Activity in Wales 2010/2011

There was a 60% increase in the number of deceased donors to 66 (in Welsh hospitals). The number of donors after brain death increased by 45% to 39 and after circulatory death by 90% to 27. There was an increase in the Welsh consent rate after brain death from 59% to 66% and after circulatory death from 28% to 62%. The number of patients registered for a transplant fell slightly to 306 were waiting at the end of March 2011 and 122 had been temporarily suspended. 49 died waiting. Nearly 200 patients received treatment.

Donated organs and tissues are currently allocated for transplantation according to need and the matching of blood and tissues type, on a UK basis. The Welsh Government’s policy intention is that the introduction of a soft opt-out system in Wales will not alter the clinical decision making for, and processes associated with, transplantation.

NOTES

Who will be included in the soft opt-out system?

The soft opt-out system for Wales will apply to people aged 18 or over who live in Wales, and who have had the opportunity to make an objection to donation of their organs and tissues in the event of their death if they so wish.

The soft opt-out system will only cover those people who both live and die in Wales and have lived in Wales for a sufficient time in order to gain knowledge and understanding of the system.

The reason for this is to ensure that such people will be aware of the system and know of the mechanisms to object; it cannot be expected that people who visit Wales will know of the arrangements, and have had the opportunity to object.

Views on the period of time individuals must have lived in Wales before being included within the soft opt-out system are sought as part of the consultation on the White Paper.

Who will not be included within the proposed soft opt-out system?

The following will not be included within the soft opt-out system:

persons who die in Wales but who do not normally live in Wales (for example visitors);

persons who die in Wales and normally live in Wales, but have not lived in Wales for the required length of time;

persons who usually live in Wales, but who die outside Wales;

persons who cannot be identified at their death;

adults (those aged 18 or over) who do not have the capacity to understand and make a decision about objecting to donation;

children and young people aged under 18 years of age;

These categories of persons have been excluded as the Welsh Government recognises that the proposals can only apply to those who have a sufficient opportunity to object to donation.

Where can I get further information?

Phone Kidney Wales Foundation on 029 2034 3940 / Tristan on 07590 216 784 or e mail tristan@kidneywales.com

http://www.optforlife.org

The White Paper consultation can be found on the Welsh Government website

http://wales.gov.uk/consultations/?lang=en&ts=1″>http://wales.gov.uk/consultations/?lang=en&ts=1

You can also email organdonation@wales.gsi.gov.ukhttp://youtu.be/3hu6C8Bf7yI Please click the link and view our video response on youtube.

A White Paper published on Tuesday 8 November 2011 outlined the legislation due to be enacted in Wales which would see the country become the first part of the United Kingdom to have an ‘Opt Out’ organ donation system.

Despite advances in transplantation medicine organ shortage is the single most limiting factor preventing potential recipients from receiving the benefits of transplantation. One person dies a week in Wales waiting for an organ transplant.

A number of countries ‘notably Belgium in 1986’ has been cited as dramatically increasing their donation rates following the introduction of presumed consent. Belgium went from 18.9pmp to 41.3pmp three years after the introduction of presumed consent

Roy J Thomas Chairman of Kidney Wales Foundation "This is progressive move by Wales and our partners Diabetes Cymru, British Heart Foundation, The British Lung Foundation, The British Medical Association are organisations that bear witness to the need for more transplants. The UK has one of the lowest donor rates in Europe. Wales will take the lead and show that we must presume to have conversations on this important issue."

There is concern that Wales might not have the service capacity, ITU beds, theatres, hospital staff, transplant co-ordinators and trained staff to cope with the increased number of donors resulting from presumed consent.

Roy J Thomas added "Presumed consent in itself is not the solution but rather a key facilitator which must be enacted in conjunction with a well developed system and infrastructure for organ donation and transplantation. This two pronged approach has been shown to deliver ongoing positive results for those whose lives are blighted and shortened by being on a waiting list for a transplant."

Mr Thomas said "There has already been a significant increase in the number of donors in Wales to 66 in 2010/11 and the people of Wales understand this debate. Wales already has the highest rate of donors in the UK at 27.7pmp. There are a number of projections as to the extent to which this is likely to increase following the introduction of presumed consent. One key research is that of Abadie and Gay where figure of 25-30% increase is predicated that would mean there would be an increase to about 83 donors or 35pmp."

Transplantation has generally been shown to be a cost effective solution particularly when examined from a societal perspective. The annual average cost for example of dialysis is